HELP JUSTIN’S® HELP THE BEES (TO HELP YOU).

an almond bee

This is a honey bee. Well, really, it’s more like a honey-almond-and-like-a-hundred-other-things-bee. After all, these buzzy little buddies are responsible for pollinating roughly 1 out of every 3 bites of food we eat.* That includes many things I put in my nut butters and treats we love so very, very much.

That makes it pretty not cool that due to a combination of pesticides and habitat loss, honey bee colonies are dying off at a rate of 39% per year.** Without bees, and pollinators like them, there would BEE no JUSTIN’S® products. So for the love of peanut butter cups, I’m asking you to help me help the bees, so they can keep helping us make nut butters and other delicious treats for you.

WHAT WOULD A WORLD WITHOUT BEES LOOK LIKE?

SO MANY WAYS TO HELP (THE BEES)

For years, JUSTIN’S® has been working with national, state and local organizations to protect pollinators through habitat conservation and expansion, sustainable agriculture, research and education. Take a look at our partners below to see how JUSTIN’S® is making an impact and how you can join us in taking action.

The National Honey Board

The National Honey Board promotes responsible industry practices to ensure the honey consumed every day is trustworthy and pure. They work with Project Apis m. on honey bee research projects designed to help honey bees and educate people about pollinator-friendly plants.

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international nonprofit that protects the natural world through their conservation efforts of invertebrates and their habitats. You can help their mission by joining one of their community science projects, becoming a member, or learning all about pollinators through their informative blogs, public events, and online webinars.

Growing Gardens: Cultivating Community through Urban Agriculture

Growing Gardens has brought regenerative agriculture education and food donations to Boulder County residents for over 25 years. They provide plenty of ways to get involved, including events, volunteer opportunities and scholarships.

People & Pollinators Action Network

People and Pollinators Action Network (PPAN) works across Colorado to promote sustainable land management practices, preserve biodiversity and more. They provide tons of ways to support pollinators, including volunteering in Denver parks, and registering for a snazzy pollinator license plate.

WHAT IN THE NUTS IS POLLINATION, ANYWAY?

Scientists explained this to me with big words, but here’s pretty much what I remember. When a mommy plant and a daddy plant love each other very much, they’ll decide to make food together. But since daddy plants are especially shy, honey bees are kind of their wingman.

a bee collecting pollen on a flower

Bees land on a flower. Pollen from the flower’s anthers (the male part of the plant) will rub onto the bee.

a bee leaving a flower to pollinate another

Then the bee takes that pollen to another flower, where the pollen sticks to the stigma (the female part).

the fruits of pollination, including honey and nuts

Then ba-da-bing, ba-da-boom, we have almonds! Or cocoa. Or even broccoli. It depends on the plant. But all those plants depend on pollinators like bees.

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